Bruce Sacked

Bruce looking down in the dumps, after loosing to Wigan last Saturday.

Steve Bruce and Sunderland have parted ways following a bad run of form in the Barclays Premier League, the first manager in the PL to be sacked this season.

The departure comes after recording only two wins in the first 13 games. A short statement from the Sunderland chairman, Ellis Short, confirmed his exit.

“It is my job to act in the best interests of our football club and I can assure everyone that this is not a decision that I have taken lightly, sadly results this season have simply not been good enough and I feel the time is right to make a change.”

It is thought that the decision had been made soon after their 2-1 defeat at home to Wigan on Saturday, however the club delayed their statement, following the tragic news of Gary Speed’s death on Sunday morning, where Football became of zero importance.

The bookies have put Martin O’Neill as the early favourite to replace Bruce, with Mark Hughes, Rafa Benitez and Guus Hiddink also included in the betting. Assistant manager Eric Black will take charge of first team duties as the club searches for a new manager.

BRUCE’S SUNDERLAND RECORD

  • Played: 98
  • Won: 29
  • Drawn: 28
  • Lost: 41

So what are your thought on the sacking of Steve Bruce? Should he of been the first manager to lose his job?

Atmospheres. What is the real problem?

The proper football fans have been there. Stood there… In the middle of January, freezing your unmentionables off, watching your team put in a half arsed effort and thinking to yourself, for the best league in the world, where is the atmosphere?!

I’m forever hearing stories off people of a later age than I of how the atmospheres are nothing compared to what they used to be, I am still waiting to have evidence to back up “the amazing Kop” stories, what about the stories from the Kippax at Maine road? And all the stories about being crammed into the Holte End at Villa Park? but why have atmospheres rapidly deteriorated? and what can we do to bring those types of amazing atmospheres back?

One of the main reasons, and perfectly understandable reasons why atmospheres have died, is all seated stadiums. One of the reasons that all standing stadiums were abolished was due to the horrors of Hillsborough where 96 Liverpool fans were crushed to death by their own supporters. So that forced stadiums to become more family friendly. But now people are calling for standing sections for people who want to create an atmosphere, and seated family sections for those who want to enjoy the game. I think this is a brilliant idea because at away games especially, 90% of the away crowd is stood up anyway, and the home crowd, especially those situated directly next to the away fans, stand up too, so isn’t it time to review the health and safety regulations and scrap some seated sections in grounds?

Another reason that atmospheres in grounds are dropping is because of the banning of flags in the ground. If you look all over Europe there are certain sections of the crowd, that are up, bouncing, singing, waving massive flags, creating an awesome atmosphere. Flares are another thing that should be allowed back in, yes they’re dangerous, but if used correctly, then they can be a phenomenon. 2 years ago in the Carling Cup Semi Final, Manchester City turned off all the lights in the stadium to create a blue moon, but the United fans countered that with 2 red flares, this got everybody fired up and really got the atmosphere going, again, all over Europe they use flares, and sometimes they take it to even greater extremes and use fireworks!

Another reason why atmospheres are declining is due to the increased daylight robbery of Football clubs charging horrific prices, just to go and watch your team in one game of Football. I have just recently bought my Liverpool away ticket, which cost me £48. Now the game is on a Sunday, and on Sky Sports, so people are very reluctant to pay those prices, for something they can get on TV. This is causing the grounds to become less populated, and therefore affecting atmospheres inside the grounds.

So in my opinion, we need a total change of the system that football uses. We need standing sections in stadiums for people who want to create an atmosphere, with flares and flags etc allowed, and ticket prices to be reduced, as well as the amount of games that are shown on TV.

 

 

Goalline technology: A fans’ view

With the ongoing debate over goal line technology the future
looks very uncertain over this controversial topic. With the FA saying that it could be introduced as early as 2013. I would like to get across some points about it. The whole point over whether a goal has crossed the line is still atopic that can cause some controversy, among Chelsea and England fans more than others. A controversial goal is one of the most infuriating things for afootball fan. Yes whether a ball crossed the line is probably the tip of this iceberg, but is installing a system of miniature cameras on goalposts necessarily the option?

My main point is that goal line technology would go too far and
end up getting used for petty things e.g. “Who’s throw in is it?” I
know the whole point is “Goal Line” but let’s say hypothetically that
it gets installed and is a success. How long until someone says we still haveproblems that could be solved with a monitor referral system (goal line technology) lets use goal line technology for something else. The whole concept would snowball and get out of control. A match these days lasts between ninety and a hundred minutes, but with technology to check even goals, and then if it got worse we could soon be at grounds for two and a half hours, forty minutes of which could be referees looking at a monitor. The system would get out of control. If it was installed then it should be on the model of rugby league, a video referee who checks tries that aren’t certain from a referee’s point of view. It would have to be installed on this basis and kept strictly to this, because any deviation would ruin football.

I would like to propose an alternative though. Look at UEFAs
system of extra referees behind the goal line. Since this there have been
no controversial “did the ball cross the line” goals awarded or
turned down. This in my opinion is the system we should look towards. With four extra referees needed in every match and soaring unemployment the concept seems so blatantly obvious it’s too good to be true. This way we would see the end of controversial goals but we would also keep the nature of the modern game.